#984  (Castle Rock, CO)

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

Roof Structures, 2009 72 in. x 48 in.

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

 

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

#1764 (Des Moines, IA)  

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

Advertisement Text Posters 30 in. x 40 in.

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

Diversity Statement 30 in. x 40 in. prints

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

American Maps from Annual Reports 1973-1992

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

 

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

#1500 (Watertown, SD)  

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

Store #43 (Junction City, Kansas)  

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

#984 (Castle Rock, CO)  Black Friday 2011

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

#984 (Castle Rock, CO)  Black Friday 2011

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

#3498 (Coon Rapids, MN)  

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

 

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.

 

Wal-Mart Project

In 2008, I began the Wal-Mart project as a localized photo survey of Wal-Mart stores in the Midwest. It since has turned into an on-going project, which explores the company’s mass-produced global presence. Represented in the largest city in the world (Tokyo, Japan) and within 3 miles of the smallest town in the U.S. (Kiel Township, Minnesota- population 1), Wal-Mart’s superstores are creating a common point in the global landscape that is unprecedented. By focusing on the physical stores as a referent for a global economy, I am examining the mass produced vernacular in terms of the sociological standards that it produces through this uniformity. With this level of continuity across the world, I am fascinated about the affect that these structures have on both the mental and physical landscape.

The project is structured around examining this corporation through two descriptive systems: one being the company’s self-image by researching and collecting publications, advertisements and corporate fact sheets produced by the company. And the other is a descriptive system that I have generated through a photo survey of the physical structures.

My work thus attempts to capture the dialogue that occurs when the expressed ideologies of a company, seen in its corporate literature, are confronted with the implicit ideology conveyed by the company’s physical structures.